Learning a language is a creative process — not a similar one. All the little impropriety you hear along the way to standard speech are signs of progress.

Receptive language precedes suggestive language — children understand more than they can say. Before new-born use words, they use cries, gestures and facial expressions to convey meaning. A child’s first word is maybe one of the most anticipated milestones. Children mostly say their first words between 12 and 18 months of age. Yet, each child has his own timetable. Babbling will become words, words short phrases and then finally sentences. Then the questions will surely come!

Don’t worry over the incorrect grammar your child uses. It’s to be expected. However, that doesn’t mean you don’t have an important role to play in encourage and supporting your child’s language development.

Here there are just a few ideas to get you started in:

Sing songs and repeat rhymes. Music is a marvellous way to help your little one engage in language development. Repeating familiar nursery songs like “It Beats Spider” is easy and fun for everyone. Repeating and singing are especially useful. The best part of music and singing is that once you know them you can take them anywhere. If you want to stop somewhere with your child, they can be life-saving.

Start by talking to your fingers. Research has shown that two elderly people may have an average of 50 more words than sign-ups., we teach languages starting with our child’s rooms. Children naturally sign their efforts when they try to communicate with adults around them. We do not always know how to interpret their signs. Using sign language, increased vocabulary develops outstanding motor skills and improves self-improvement.

Read to your child. It should come as no surprise to you that I highly recommend reading as one of the best ways to increase your child’s language development. Your child has the possibility of favourite books that they want to hear again. Look for books with the good drawing that match the words on the page and invite your child to participate by repeating a refrain or by asking them to guess what comes next.

Leave a Comment